Avian Influenza outbreaks in Saint Lucia ,Restricts Importation Of Poultry From UK & Europe – WIC News

Castries, Saint Lucia :Saint Lucia has provisionally limited the importation of chicken from the United Kingdom, and Europe, calling the Avian Influenza breaks.

The Veterinary & Livestock Services Division regarding the Ministry of Agriculture told local merchants of the measure in a letter.

The letter remarked that the division had monitored and decided the current situation at Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) outbreaks in Europe and the UK in particular.

It stated that as a result, a temporary restriction had been placed on the importation of fresh, chilled and frozen poultry meat from the UK and Europe with immediate effect.

The limitation also applies to the importation of alive birds and hatchling eggs from the UK.

According to the Veterinary and Livestock Division, processed chicken stored in hermetically sealed containers and managed to destroy the HPAI virus can be imported.

But it must be accompanied by an International Veterinary Health Certificate issued by the United Kingdom Veterinary Authority, attesting that it was so treated.

The Veterinary and Livestock Division says it will continue to monitor the situation and advise of any further developments.

According to the United States Centres for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), Asian HPAI H5N1 viruses have infected the respiratory tract of humans, causing severe illness such as pneumonia and respiratory failure and death in some people.

The Risk/Reward of a “Healthy” Diet – Bel Marra Health

Plant-based diets can be healthy. They can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol if done properly. They can also substantially increase the risk of a broken bone.

Hip, leg, or any other bone, for that matter.

A new study published in BMC Medicine found that vegetarians, vegans, and pescatarians (those who eat fish but no other meat) suffer bone breaks at significantly higher rates than those who eat meat.

Hip fractures, a particularly severe bone break, happened at a rate of 2.3x more among vegans.

Even after researchers took body mass index (BMI), protein, and calcium intake into account, a major difference in risk remained.

Non-meat eaters generally get less calcium and protein than omnivores, which may play a role in fracture risk. They may translate to lower bone density and a lack of quality muscle support. Dairy and meat, both animal products, are a great source of these nutrients.

It’s also rather easy for those following a plant-based diet to come up short on other nutrients like vitamin D, B-vitamins, vitamin K, iron, and zinc, which can all contribute to strong bones.

You don’t necessarily need to eat a lot of animal foods to improve bone health. But including them can offer a big nutritional hit to help support your body’s structure and limit the risk of breaks.

Along with including some more meat in your diet, take a close look at what “plant-based” means to you. If it means eating anything that isn’t meat, you won’t necessarily experience your desired health benefits. Potato chips, soda, and plenty of other junk food are “plant-based” and easily fit into a vegetarian or vegan diet.

No matter what kind of diet you select, realize there are inherent risks and rewards. Generally speaking, a diet that focuses on eliminating an entire food group isn’t necessarily the healthiest choice.

For strong, healthy bones and a lower risk of fractures, feature healthful animal products in your diet. They can easily fit into a high-vegetable eating plan.


Avian Influenza outbreaks in Saint Lucia ,Restricts Importation Of Poultry From UK & Europe – WIC News

Castries, Saint Lucia :Saint Lucia has provisionally limited the importation of chicken from the United Kingdom, and Europe, calling the Avian Influenza breaks.

The Veterinary & Livestock Services Division regarding the Ministry of Agriculture told local merchants of the measure in a letter.

The letter remarked that the division had monitored and decided the current situation at Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) outbreaks in Europe and the UK in particular.

It stated that as a result, a temporary restriction had been placed on the importation of fresh, chilled and frozen poultry meat from the UK and Europe with immediate effect.

The limitation also applies to the importation of alive birds and hatchling eggs from the UK.

According to the Veterinary and Livestock Division, processed chicken stored in hermetically sealed containers and managed to destroy the HPAI virus can be imported.

But it must be accompanied by an International Veterinary Health Certificate issued by the United Kingdom Veterinary Authority, attesting that it was so treated.

The Veterinary and Livestock Division says it will continue to monitor the situation and advise of any further developments.

According to the United States Centres for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), Asian HPAI H5N1 viruses have infected the respiratory tract of humans, causing severe illness such as pneumonia and respiratory failure and death in some people.

Study suggests diabetic eye disease associated with five-fold risk of severe COVID-19 – New Kerala


London , November 28: The findings of a new study suggests that people who are suffering from diabetes and eye disease have a five-fold increased risk of requiring intubation when hospitalised with COVID-19.
The study, published today in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice by King’s College London, identified for the first time the risk associated with diabetic retinopathy and COVID-19.

Diabetic eye disease is a common complication of diabetes and is caused by damage to the small blood vessels in the eye. In 2014, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 54.6 per cent in people with Type 1 diabetes and 30.0 per cent in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The study investigated 187 people with diabetes (179 with type 2 diabetes and 8 with type 1 diabetes) hospitalised with COVID-19 at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust between 12th of March and 7th of April 2020.

Diabetic retinopathy was reported in 67 (36 per cent) of patients, the majority with background retinopathy. Of the 187 patients hospitalised with severe COVID-19, 26 per cent were intubated and 45 per cent of these patients had retinopathy. Retinopathy was associated with a five-fold increased risk for intubation. In the cohort, 32 per cent of patients died and no association was observed between retinopathy and mortality.

First author of the study, Dr. Antonella Corcillo from the School of Cardiovascular Medicine and Sciences at King’s College London said “This is the first time that retinopathy has been linked to severe COVID-19 in people with diabetes. Retinopathy is a marker of damage to the blood vessels and our results suggest that such pre-existing damage to blood vessels may result in a more severe COVID-19 infection requiring intensive care treatment.

Senior author, Dr Janaka Karalliedde from King’s College London, said “There is increasing evidence that there is significant damage to the blood vessels in the lung and other organs in patients hospitalised with severe COVID-19. People with diabetes are at high risk of vascular complications affecting the large and small blood vessels.

“We hypothesise that the presence of diabetes-related vascular disease such as retinopathy may result in greater vulnerability and susceptibility to respiratory failure in severe COVID-19. Therefore looking for the presence or history of retinopathy or other vascular complications of diabetes may help health care professionals identify patients at high risk of severe COVID-19. Further studies are required to investigate the possible mechanisms that explain the links between markers and manifestations of diabetic vascular disease such as retinopathy and severe COVID-19.”

RNIB Specialist Lead for Eye Health, Dr. Louise Gow said “RNIB hope this research will result in greater awareness of those who are most at risk of serious complications from COVID-19. With vaccine planning underway, consideration must be given to prioritising people with diabetic retinopathy. It also highlights that it is vital that information about COVID-19 is available in formats that are accessible to people with sight loss so that they know how to protect themselves.”

Limitations of this study include its relatively small sample size and that, as it is a cross-sectional study, it is unable to identify a causal relationship between retinopathy and severe COVID-19 outcomes.

Study suggests diabetic eye disease associated with five-fold risk of severe COVID-19

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Type O Blood Linked to Lower COVID Risk, Taking Vitamin D Unlikely to Help – The Rio Times

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RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Certain blood groups less likely to get COVID-19

A large study adds to evidence that people with type O or Rh−negative blood may be at slightly lower risk from the new coronavirus. Among 225,556 Canadians who were tested for the virus, the risk for a COVID-19 diagnosis was 12% lower and the risk for severe COVID-19 or . . .

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Every move counts towards better health, says WHO – MENAFN.COM

(MENAFN – Caribbean News Global)

GENEVA, Switzerland — Up to five million deaths a year could be averted if the global population was more active. At a time when many people are homebound due to COVID-19, new World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour, launched November 26, emphasized that everyone, of all ages and abilities, can be physically active and that every type of movement counts.

The new guidelines recommend at least 150 to 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week for all adults, including people living with chronic conditions or disability, and an average of 60 minutes per day for children and adolescents.

WHO statistics show that one in four adults, and four out of five adolescents, do not get enough physical activity. Globally this is estimated to cost US$54 billion in direct health care and another US$14 billion to lost productivity.

The guidelines encourage women to maintain regular physical activity throughout pregnancy and post-delivery. They also highlight the valuable health benefits of physical activity for people living with disabilities.

Older adults (aged 65 years or older) are advised to add activities which emphasize balance and coordination, as well as muscle strengthening, to help prevent falls and improve health.

Regular physical activity is key to preventing and helping to manage heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and cancer, as well as reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, reducing cognitive decline, improving memory and boosting brain health.

‘Being physically active is critical for health and well-being – it can help to add years to life and life to years,’ said WHO director-general Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. ‘Every move counts, especially now as we manage the constraints of the COVID-19 pandemic. We must all move every day – safely and creatively.’

All physical activity is beneficial and can be done as part of work, sport and leisure or transport (walking, wheeling and cycling), but also through dance, play and everyday household tasks, like gardening and cleaning.

‘Physical activity of any type, and any duration can improve health and wellbeing, but more is always better,’ said Dr Ruediger Krech, director of health promotion, World Health Organization, ‘and if you must spend a lot of time sitting still, whether at work or school, you should do more physical activity to counter the harmful effects of sedentary behaviour.’

‘These new guidelines highlight how important being active is for our hearts, bodies and minds, and how the favourable outcomes benefit everyone, of all ages and abilities’, said Dr Fiona Bull, head of the physical activity unit which led the development of the new WHO guidelines.

WHO encourages countries to adopt the global guidelines to develop national health policies in support of the WHO Global action plan on physical activity 2018-2030. The plan was agreed by global health leaders at the 71st World Health Assembly in 2018 to reduce physical inactivity by 15 percent by 2030.

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Early weight gain in kids linked to leptin production – Malaysia Sun

Washington [US], November 28 (ANI): A recent study has found that young children of African ancestry are more at risk of developing obesity if they possess a genetic variant that reduces their ability to produce the hormone leptin.

Leptin may play a stronger role in weight control in children, than adults.

Adults with the variant do not have the same risk, suggesting that leptin plays a role in the development of obesity at a young age but the obesity does not continue into adulthood.

This is one of the findings made in an international study by scientists at the University of Copenhagen, University of Exeter, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and others, who investigated the role of genetics in controlling leptin levels.

“Our findings suggest that young children might be particularly sensitive to the effect of leptin in controlling their body weight,” says Associate Professor Tuomas Kilpelainen from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research (CBMR) at the University of Copenhagen.

Understanding variation in leptin levels through geneticsIt has long been established that the hormone leptin is released by the body’s fat tissue and tells the brain how much fat is stored on the body – the more body fat a person has, the higher the levels of leptin. The brain uses this information to regulate a person’s appetite and food intake.

Leptin levels vary between individuals, however, and around 10 to 20 per cent of individuals with obesity have the same leptin levels as individuals with normal weight. This variation raises questions about the role leptin plays in regulating weight.

In the research, published in Diabetes, the scientists screened the genome of more than 55,000 people for genetic variants that affect leptin levels. They identified five new genetic variants that play a role in regulating leptin levels.

One of the variations, Vel94Met, which reduces the amount of leptin that the body produces, is only found in individuals of African ancestry. Young people with this variation are more at risk of developing obesity, though this is not true of adults with the variation, who tend to be of similar weight as other adults.This finding supports the theory that people become less sensitive to leptin with age. Administering leptin to obese adults has proven ineffective at controlling their weight.

“This new knowledge on the impact of leptin in the weight control of young people now needs to be followed up with further studies to uncover the molecular mechanisms that underlie this age-dependent relationship between leptin and BMI,” says Associate Professor Tuomas Kilpelainen. (ANI)

Hormone to suppress hunger discovered – Big News Network

Washington [US], November 28 (ANI): In recent research, scientists have discovered a hormone that can suppress food intake and increase the feeling of fullness in mice has shown similar results in humans and non-human primates.

The study was published in the journal eLife.

The hormone, called Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), could be used as a potential treatment in people with obesity whose natural signals for feeling full no longer work.

LCN2 is mainly produced by bone cells and is found naturally in mice and humans. Studies in mice have shown that giving LCN2 to the animals long term reduces their food intake and prevents weight gain, without leading to a slow-down in their metabolism.

“LCN2 acts as a signal for satiety after a meal, leading mice to limit their food intake, and it does this by acting on the hypothalamus within the brain,” explains lead author Peristera-Ioanna Petropoulou, who was a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, US, at the time the study was carried out and is now at the Helmholtz Diabetes Center, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Munich, Germany. “We wanted to see whether LCN2 has similar effects in humans and whether a dose of it would be able to cross the blood-brain barrier.”The team first analysed data from four different studies of people in the US and Europe who were either normal weight, overweight, or living with obesity. The people in each study were given a meal after an overnight fast, and the amount of LCN2 in their blood before and after the meal was studied. The researchers found that in those who were of normal weight, there was an increase in LCN2 levels after the meal, which coincided with how satisfied they felt after eating.

By contrast, in people who were overweight or had obesity, LCN2 levels decreased after a meal. Based on this post-meal response, the researchers grouped people as non-responders or responders. Non-responders, who showed no increase in LCN2 after a meal, tended to have a larger waist circumference and higher markers of metabolic disease — including BMI, body fat, increased blood pressure, and increased blood glucose. Remarkably, however, people who had lost weight after gastric bypass surgery were found to have a restored sensitivity to LCN2 — changing their status from non-responders before their surgery, to responders afterwards.

Taken together, these results mirror those seen in mice and suggest that this loss of post-meal LCN2 regulation is a new mechanism contributing to obesity and could be a potential target for weight-loss treatments.

After verifying that LCN2 can cross into the brain, the team explored whether treatment with the hormone might reduce food intake and prevent weight gain. To do this, they treated monkeys with LCN2 for a week. They saw a 28 per cent decrease in food intake compared with that before treatment within a week, and the monkeys also ate 21 per cent less than their counterparts who were treated only with saline. Moreover, after only one week of treatment, measurements of body weight, body fat, and blood fat levels showed a declining trend in treated animals.

“We have shown that LCN2 crosses to the brain, makes its way to the hypothalamus, and suppresses food intake in non-human primates,” concludes senior author Stavroula Kousteni, Professor of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. “Our results show that the hormone can curb appetite with negligible toxicity and lay the groundwork for the next level of LCN2 testing for clinical use.” (ANI)